From the moment Njideka took an early leave home from work that day he made the wrong move. From the moment he stepped out of his office door, the building and then into his car he had already disappointed himself, his family, a whole generation of men born and unborn, and also his niece, Nonye.
It was a beautiful sun-kissed afternoon. The sky was blue beyond blue, uncaged birds sang, and to cut a long story short, nature was livid.

Afternoons was Nonye’s free time. By then she was sure to have her uncle’s house all to herself. That day, she had just finished with fetching water from the neighbourhood well and still, she didn’t expect anyone to be home. Nonye having fetched an ample amount of water needed by the house was drenched, the wetness traced out her figure and the pointiness of her nipples erect from a chill up her spine. That was when Njideka walked into her room and closed the door behind him. Startled Nonye was, but later she found her words and spoke first. “Uncle you’re home early, I didn’t expect anyone to be home by this time, it’s mostly the kids from school,” she said.
Njideka didn’t respond or look away like he normally did when he noticed Nonye’s nubile body, he stood there glued to the spot staring until Nonye began to look uncomfortable.
Nonye turned away and her eyes searched the floor for something when she found what she was looking for she hurriedly bent to pick the wrapper she used as headgear for her bucket to cover herself, but before she stood and regained composure Njideka was almost in front of her. Nonye yelped and jerked backwards “uncle what is this you’re scaring me, please go outside and allow me to change,” she said, avoiding Njideka’s gaze and waiting for him to leave but he didn’t, Njideka stood there staring, anxiousness growing wild in him and his protruding trousers was evidence to his random thoughts. Njideka pressed himself into Nonye with his eyes closed and his mouth heading for her neck. Nonye backed away slowly but not quick enough to miss Njideka’s hungry breath on her neck.
“Come on, uncle,” Nonye said, pushing Njideka back. She used the wrapper to cover herself while walking away to another end of the room.

Her plea, her flight, all was unless. Soon, Njideka was in front of her. “My kids don’t come back until two hours and my wife doesn’t come back until dusk,” he said, as he advanced, slowly. With each step, Njideka took Nonye crept back. They were alone in the house and she had nowhere to run, even if she yelled no one would hear. “Nonye, why do you keep running away from me, you’ve been doing that since you came to my house and today you have no place else to run, not today,” Njideka said, in a low raspy voice quite different from his normal baritone, he wasn’t in control of himself, he had lost his mind. “You might even enjoy it. And don’t bother about telling my wife, she already thinks you wear short dresses on purpose.”

Njideka grabbed Nonye from the wall and pressed his lips tightly on hers, she fought him off with feeble punches. Nonye pushed Njideka away and ran but he pulled at her dress and it tore. Seeing the damage done Njideka leapt and tried to kiss Nonye again but then she bit him, tasting the copper tang of his blood on her tongue. Njideka groaned, he became angry. He punched an explosion of white and black in Nonye’s skull and she fell to the ground. Njideka touched his lips and felt blood, he was angry, he slapped Nonye twice and, with saliva dripping from the sides of his mouth, Njideka shoved Nonye’s torn dress up her waist and groaned, guttural like an animal.

Something veiny and hard prodded between Nonye’s legs and she knew Njideka had won the fight.